Iman Manavitehrani1, Ali Fathi2, Dax Calder3, Aaron Schindeler1,4, Fariba Dehghani1

 

1The University of Sydney, School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Sydney, Australia
2Trimph Technology Pty Ltd. Australian Technology Park, Sydney, Australia
3The University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia
4Orthopaedic Research & Biotechnology, The Children’s Hospital at Westmead, Westmead, 2145, Australia,

 

The explantation surgery of an implanted prosthesis often causes clinical complications, and the patient suffers from the countless post-surgical symptoms such as infection and the lack of mobility. This issue has been clinically addressed using biodegradable polymers such as poly(lactic acid) with favourable physical and biological properties. However, the acidic degradation of these polymers causes delays in the tissue regeneration process and necrosis. We attempted to address this issue by developing new classes of biomaterials. For example, we introduce a biodegradable material based on poly(propylene carbonate) (PPC) and starch with benign degradation by-products that is only water and carbon dioxide. This polymer has superior characteristics compared with other polyesters. The results of in vitro and in vivo studies endorsed the biocompatibility of this polymer blends. In addition, we observed in vivo osseointegration effects of this implant in a rat hemiarthroplasty model.  Therefore, this product is superior for orthopaedic fixation implantation. In yet another study we synthesized a thermo-responsive hydrogel with the capacity to chemically bond with primary amine groups of proteins. This hydrogel has favourable gelation time that can be used as an injectable material for delivery of active compounds.  The results of in vitro and in vivo studies show that this hydrogel is biocompatible with tunable mechanical properties and adhesiveness that make them suitable for broad range of musculoskeletal tissue repair.  Our recent clinical study demonstrate that this hydrogel can be used successfully for socket preservation.