Samuel I. Stupp

 

Northwestern University
2220 Campus Drive
Evanston, Illinois 60208, USA

 

Soft matter is of central importance in technology and covalent polymers of various molecular architectures presently dominate the field, yielding low density and low cost materials that are designed for specific properties through processing techniques and repeat unit chemistry.  Great advances in the fields of self-assembly, nanoscience, and supramolecular chemistry over the past two decades have now established emerging new directions in the design of soft matter that focus on dynamic behavior with potential to emulate living-like systems.  Supramolecular nanostructures as well as biomolecular chemistry are playing a central role in these new directions. Another important axis for parts of this field is the integration of covalent polymers, which provide mechanical robustness, with highly dynamic structures based on small molecules with finite bond lifetimes.  This lecture will describe several systems to illustrate new developments in this field, for example bioactive systems with the capacity to switch biological signals on and off or switch from one signal to another the way biology does it.  Other systems to be described can adapt and reconfigure to activate proteins or reversibly form hierarchical structures, regenerate themselves, or actuate macroscopically in anisotropic fashion inspired by muscle.

 

 

Biographic Details

Name: Samuel I. Stupp

Title: Board of Trustees Professor of Materials Science & Engineering, Chemistry, Medicine, and Biomedical Engineering

Director, Simpson Querrey Institute for BioNanotechnology

 

Northwestern University

2220 Campus Drive

Evanston, Illinois 60208, USA

 

Phone: (847) 491-3002

E-mail: s-stupp@northwestern.edu